Berget 9.

Discussion in 'Staff Reviews' started by Robin-Hood, Jul 15, 2011.

  1. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    As some of you may know I attended an event call Berget earlier this year. In this thread I will attempt to provide you with an overall image and feel for the event, what it entails as well as all the basic information and resources to find out more.

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    Players - 1,600
    AO - Approximately 13km2 Mountainous Woodland
    Location - Harnosand, Sweden

    Teams:
    Northern Alliance Forces (NAF) - 400 Players - Desert Camo Patterns
    Zansian Black Ops/The Firm - 150 Players - OD/Civvies - Allied with NAF
    UN Forces - 100 Players - Any Camo Used Within NATO/UN - Neutral
    Poldavian Military - 550 Players - Woodland Camo Patterns
    Civilians - 250 Players - Any clothing, must look civilian or thrown together

    Ticket Price:
    October: 92 EURO (Aprox $130USD)
    November: 122 EURO (Aprox $170USD)
    December: 142 EURO (Aprox $200USD)
    January: 162 EURO (Aprox $230USD)

    Scenario:
    In the fall of 2005, the research project I-HEAL (Interceptive High Energy Army Laser) had a major breakthrough, creating a laser with the capability of destroying airborne missiles travelling at very high velocities. A few years later, a satellite-borne version of this laser, the I-HEAL-S1, was developed, with the main purpose of functioning as a defensive counter measure stationed in orbit around the planet.
    On September the 14th 2010, one of the three satellites equipped with the I-HEAL-S1 lasers malfunctioned and went down somewhere over the country of Poldavia. The satellite, codename Phoenix C35687, is yet to be found.
    Ever since the military campaign of the Poldavian Army came to a frustrating halt, due to the cease fire in Arbedid Valley in the early summer of 2010, the poldavian leaders had been searching for an opportunity to shift the balance of power to a poldavian advantage. This opportunity was now seen in finding the satellite and retrieving the I-HEAL, which led to the launch of Operation Phoenix down.
    The operation that initially seemed as a simple find and retrieve mission was proven to be far from easy, with the Northern Allied Forces, consisting of battled-hardened veterans from Arbedid Valley, a large fraction of The Resistance, and the recently joined reinforcements from the neighbouring country of Zansia.
    In the middle of this, as in a vise between the two forces, is the small mountain town of Janco, where farmers for generations have tended to their coffee plantations. Due to the military build up in the area and the exposed situation for the townspeople refusing to leave their plantations and their family homes, the United Nations has established a Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) around the town of Janco in attempt to protect the civilians, and maintain law and order.
    For each day the pressure is growing on the UN forces to disband the DMZ and leave Janco to its destiny. The poldavian forces are trying hard to find evidence that fighting forces like the resistance are hiding inside of the town of Janco. If this would be proven, UN is by internationall law forced to disband its pressence in Poldavia and Janco. The race to find the downed satellite codename Phoenix has only begun...
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2011
  2. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

    9,109
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    Some more basic info:
    You must be 18 years of age and have valid photo ID at check in.
    You must not be under the influence of Alcohol or Drugs at any time otherwise you will be banned.
    You must obey the rules and the Berget Events staff at all times otherwise you will be banned.
    As a participant you must have your insurance cover in order and have any relevant documentation with you.
    You must be prepared to walk, a lot! (We believe we walked approximately 15-20km a day, perhaps more)
    You must be open to MILSIM and Roleplay elements. (The LARP will probably be new to some people, don't be scared, it adds to the game experience. Trust me)
    You must understand that Berget is not all about Milsim or all about combat or all about LARP, it's the combination of elements that makes it what it is.

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    My $0.02:
    Ventilation is important! It gets HOT. When you're climbing a mountain in 85-95'F with your gun and 20lbs of gear you will get very hot and sweaty, if you're wearing a massive padded plate carrier with a thousand pouches to top it of you are NOT going to be able to ventilate and you WILL overheat. You do not need half the gear you think you need and you can fit twice as much of it into half as many pouches if you try. You also do not need 15 magazines, two sidearms, a backup AEG, a swimming pool and a shotgun. A chest rig and a camelback will give you more than enough carrying capacity.

    Hydration! Yes everyone always goes on and on about hydration, and that's because it is very important. I would say a 3L camelbak is a requirement. I took a 3L camelbak and a 750ml nalgene bottle, I drank it all each day and I am a thin, reasonably healthy person. I'm pretty sure I got a little dehydrated by the end of the event as well. With the heat, the gear and the amount of walking you will need it.

    I also recommend that you have well worn in, completely squared away gear that you have used significantly and are comfortable in. Ditch most of the "just for looks" stuff, it is not necessary. Go for function and practicality. Trust me, you do not want an extra 10lbs of gear to haul up and down mountains for four days when it serves no purpose other than to look pretty.

    Good quality, well worn in, boots with solid ankle support are a must! Some of the terrain is just gnarly and you will not enjoy yourself if your boots rub or you break an ankle on the rocks! Good hiking/boot socks of some sort are a must too.

    The sheer scale of Berget makes it a completely unique experience, no where in the world will you find an event that can compete in terms of size and numbers. You get from Berget what you put in, if you complain constantly and fixate on the suck you WILL NOT have fun. If you take it as MILSIM on an epic scale and as the experience of a lifetime you will enjoy yourself, I guarantee it. If you put the effort in you can become completely immersed in the game, and that feeling is amazing. Despite Bergets scale that fact becomes almost irrelevant, once you are emmersed in the event it becomes about Quality of experience rather than Quantity. There are a few small moments from the game that I am sure I will remember for the rest of my airsofting days.

    If I told you that you'll go and enjoy every moment, I would be lying. It's as simple as that. I cannot stress this enough: You will get bored, you will get hot, you will get cold, you will get wet, you will get hungry, you will get tired, you will get aggitated, you will get sore feet, you will walk all over the place, and you will get bitten to hell and back by bugs. But most of all, you will enjoy the **** out of it! It comes down to what kind of player you are!


    On that note, lets quickly cover what sort of people will enjoy Berget.

    If you have never attended a game longer than 24 hours, then I do not suggest you come. (Get some more experience first)

    If you play airsoft as if it is a contest, then I do not suggest you come.
    (The winner of Berget is who has the most fun, the outcome of the game is barely even discussed among players. Due to the continuing nature of the storyline and the way objectives work it's irrelevant as niether team can truly "lose".)

    If you want lots of action and to shoot people frequently. (Then this game is not for you, and that's okay. I suggest you stick to fun weekend games to get your fix, you'll see more action in a days CQB skirmish than the entire Berget event)

    However if you are a well seasoned airsofter, you're used to play with mid/low caps, you have attended various OPs or larger airsoft events and you are looking for more than just a skirmish or a weekend game. If you are willing to put in the effort, take things slow at times , deal with the suck and adapt to the style of play at Berget. Then you will most likely have a lot of fun!

    If you are a MILSIM player who appreciates all aspects of the game, organisation, military structure, follows orders, understands the need for guard duty, understands and accepts recon and not engaging the enemy at every possible opportunity, has some experience, is relatively physically fit and will not complain at the lack of comforts. Then this game is perfect for you.

    If you are a serious roleplayer who will care a lot about the in game politics, the storyline, the interaction between players and factions and the tasks assigned to you then you will be given a lot of freedom and you will have the potential to completely sway the balance of the game, set the tone for the whole event and add to the experience for all other players simply by attending.

    If you are any combination of the above 3 you fit right in and I believe you will have a lot of fun and leave with some very unique memories.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2011

  3. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    The quality of some of the players and the FPS limits change the game quite significantly. For example allowing bolt actions that shot up to 620FPS meant that snipers could actually snipe, similarly support gunners are actually able to provide decent suppressive and cover fire as they have a noticeable higher FPS limit than regular rifles. Weapons are divided into classes and each has an FPS limit and a BB weight limit. We all chose to use weapons under 360FPS/110m/s which means we had a one metre minimum engagement distance whereas those with 620FPS bolt actions were restricted to 100 feet MED. In the close knit woodland and considering the accuracy of airsoft weapons and the travel times of our projectiles we generally find it far superior to close with and engage our targets from a more reasonable distance than suffer the high chance of consistently missing at long range but not being allowed to close with your enemy. These sorts of limits are unusual for UK airsofters (350 is normally the max on AEGs, 400 for semi only AEGs and 500 for bolt actions.) It will be less foreign to you Americans however I believe the absolute max is still notably higher. Surprisingly the MEDs seemed to be adhered to (I dont find they are normally), I'm happy to allow close engagements up to 400FPS personally so I never found any issues despite some pretty close contacts where they could have been overstepping their MEDs by a few metres. I'll talk about safety later.

    With the entire Zansian team being Finnish military/ex military they were a practically unstoppable force, coming up against them was like coming up against a brick wall, except made of BBs and pain.

    At one point while standing near the HQ tent our camp was attacked by either a lone sniper or a sniper+spotter team. They took one shot, hit one of the men guarding the gate. The alarm sounds, I move the 50 metres to the gate from the HQ, one of the MG positions at the gate opens up on some trees, people run around shouting, nothing happens. About 5-10 minutes later they took another shot from what I can only assume was a totally different location, hit another man guarding the gate. Chaos ensues again, the nearby woodland is swept by a squad of Russians while the gate guard is doubled. Not a single person to be found, the guy(s) bugged out without a sound or a trace. It was amazingly skilful.

    There were a whole load of points of interest dotted around the game area, including the camps for each team, the civilian town as well as some 'Supply Points' & 'Tactical Points' which provided us with things like advance respawn locations, points which simulated things like ammo, fuel, supplies for our commanders to use on assets like airstrikes, artillery, extra troop transport, etc. As well as simply giving the team in control of each point a valuable strategic location and some form of control over that section of the AO.

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    The game area was just massive! When you're on patrol or a mission, moving relatively slowly, not travelling directly to your target and stopping when you think you hear something or encounter people it feels even larger. It's certainly possible to get turned around and lost, especially in the heat of fighting or if the fog comes in like it did one day for us. Even at night it felt different despite the fact it stayed light 24hrs a day. On the foggy day visibility got so bad that maps became almost useless because you had no landmarks to go by, just trees, the high iron content in the mountains sometimes screwed up compasses so no reading could be 100% certain. Eventually we had to rely on a couple of dudes with Garmin 401 GPSs to guide us as we were following our recon element who had gotten lost and we ended up about 1km out side the game area before realising we'd taken a wrong turn on the way to our objective.

    We put a plastic cover over the IR Laser Emitter to make sure it wouldn't get damaged by the rain.
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    It was amazingly eery and unnerving walking through the hills with such low visibility, the sound of artillery in the background echoing across the hills, at any moment you could be ambushed. Would they see you? Would you see them? It felt like you could literally stumble over and enemy unit at any moment. This becomes even more prevalent when you realise the cost of death at Berget, being killed meant you had to travel all the way back to a respawn, normally your main camp which usually very far away, then once there you would have to wait for up to half an hour before you could leave. So at minimum it would probably take about an hour to respawn, if you're an officer or VIP the time is doubled, or worse you get captured by hostile forces.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2011
  4. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    I found the attitude to safety simply superb. If you did something stupid and got hurt it was your own damn fault! There were numerous player driven vehicles on each team zipping around at 30 or so miles per hour, there were events run vehicles driving faster (& im sure some of the players did), there were people hanging off the backs and sides of trucks, there were people packed into vehicles so tightly that one had to straddle the gear shifter, there was at times unguided pyrotechnics flying mere metres over head, there was in game sleeping and all sorts of other hazards but I didn't hear of any serious injuries and only a few minor ones. Even when it came to eyepro, in camp we took ours off our eyes occasionally and had them very nearby, in a pocket or on our lap or on our head but giving our face a break, no one batted an eyelid. If we got attacked (which we would know about long before it got near our tent) then I would just put them on again, simple as that. We had a designated firing range & zeroing ground in the camp so even friendly fire wasn't much of a concern. If I got hurt it's my own fault for taking them off briefly and of course I accept that. I saw many other players doing the same thing. There were even residential houses and actual civilians within the game area, we were simply expected not to be stupid and safety our weapons around them and their homes. Just common sense, don't be a douche.

    This pic shows somewhat the scale of the AO, as well as one of the actual civilian houses I mentioned.
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    One example of a teams in game vehicle.
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    Last edited: Jul 15, 2011
  5. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    The LARP aspects were very cool. They added so much to the game I only wish I had been able to do more roleplay and less airsoft. Next year I'm making this one of my priorities. The LARP went so deep that we even went to the in game town and bought actual cans of cola and cookies with the in game Berget Dollars! I tip my hat to the civilians who took their roll so seriously, it really gave an amazing feeling to the whole game and we actually felt hesitant to shoot civilians and went out of our way to facilitate their needs, that is until they turned against us and we went all Soviet Russia on them!

    The demilitarised zone set up by the UN forces around the town was a very cool feature, sadly a lot of the UN forces didn't seem to take it or their ROE too seriously. It was still a nice addition but could have been an epic aspect of the game. The hostility between the UN+Civilians and the Poldavian Army all started because of a simple misunderstood radio message from on of our officers. So, as I said, we went all soviet russia/bosnia on them and wiped out the entire UN force and a load of civilians which means the UN probably won't be there next Berget as part of the continuing story line. Pretty cool if you ask me, what we do really affects the outcome of the game and the overall plot. You can look at it after and say, "I contributed to that!" or "I was there when that happened".

    A picture of the southern entrance to the demilitarised zone and part of the civilian town visible in the background.
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  6. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    Because northern Sweden is in the arctic circle it never gets dark in the summer. It's pretty cool, we played until early into the morning each day and not once did we need a torch or night vision gear. Even on the foggy day the mist had lifted by the evening and it was still reasonably light through the cloud cover. It did get a little confusing though as it would feel like 9pm and then you'd look at your watch and it would say 3am. The lack of darkness definitely facilitated the idea of continuous play, it definitely quietened down somewhat but you still had the feeling activities were taking place and you were part of a much larger picture throughout the night.

    This is the darkest it got, I believe this was taken at approximately 4am.
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    Most of the people we met at Berget were fantastic, of course there were a couple of sour apples but they were honestly few and far between and they definitely didn't spoil the event, I only had one hostile altercation with another player and that was due to him clearly being very tired and grumpy but forcing himself to continue playing which is simply foolish. I also only witnessed one incident of a player 100% not calling his hits, this was one of the same squad as the angry tired man and I shot him several times on full auto before approaching, he fired back and missed. My support gunner then engaged him on full auto until he called his hit at which point he limped off quietly. I believe they were Spanish or Portuguese. (If you happen to read this you should have called it, you clearly noticed the hits as you span round and went prone and fired back, I could see you clearly from the hilltop and kept shooting your helmet. I was polite shooting you there instead of somewhere painful and you betrayed that trust in the honor code so quite frankly you deserved my support gunners 400 FPS full auto from 10 metres away.) Calling Berget an airsoft game just doesn't do it justice, calling it an event just about fits the bill. Next year (2012) is Berget 10, and as the name suggests it is the 10th anniversary of the series. I promise you it is going to be something special. I suggest you really consider coming and if you decide to, put a lot of effort into making it the trip of a lifetime, this is definitely a unique opportunity, the 10th anniversary of such an event series doesn't come often.

    Perhaps you find out some new info about the events, perhaps this is the first you've heard of it. Either way I hope this gives you some insight into the Berget game series and I hope it influences you to attend. I started writing this at 2.30am and finished at 5.30 so apologies if there are a tonne of mistakes (which I don't doubt) but it seems okay to me in my current state.

    Here are a couple of bonus pics to finish you off.

    A view of the Poldavian in game vehicle park and across some of the camp
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    Me and another British member of Tango company posing for the camera. You'll notice we are quite dirty.
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    If you wish to see more you can download one of our squad members library of photos from Berget 9 Here & view a different gallery of pictures from another squad memberHere.

    You can find more about the Berget Events series at Berget-Events and on their forums which can be found through the Berget 9 page.

    Credit for the photos in this thread goes to Denis Hoppe & James, (except the title one I photo-shopped that)
     
  7. LongIslandAirsoft5

    LongIslandAirsoft5 New Member

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    New York
    1600 players! Wow thats insane. I wish I could go.
     
  8. Henson

    Henson New Member

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    New York
    Well, I guess I am now going to youtube and finding as many videos of this as I can :D
     
  9. Grudge

    Grudge New Member

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    Winnipeg
    Well I read this and thought WOW. Then I went to the site and read more. After I picked my jaw up off the ground, I realized that our little games with 50 or 60 guys are nothing!
     
  10. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    Yeah, it really is awesome, Grudge!
    If you want to see some videos these two are the official ones and probably the best two, of the previous two events. The Berget 9 video hasn't been posted yet.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEUFghGo0Dk]‪Berget 7 Airsoftgame‬‏ - YouTube[/ame]

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHBRCXXlWnI]‪Berget 8 Airsoftgame‬‏ - YouTube[/ame]
     
  11. A1RS0FTPL4Y3R

    A1RS0FTPL4Y3R New Member

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    Outside ur window
    That sounds and looks amazing! If they had something like that in the states I would definetely go! I would probably sleep for the next week after all the walking though.
     
  12. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    I have just been informed there is an event elsewhere that allowed for almost 3000 players in 2008 so I've removed the "biggest airsoft game in the world" part.

    Though from what I've seen I would still rather attend Berget. The other game "Big Combat" seems like pure chaos & confusion, the videos just show raw number of players thrown in to fight each other.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2011
  13. Shiftyshooter

    Shiftyshooter Learn from your mistakes. Lifetime Supporter

    10,228
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    Prague
    That is basically, what happened :)
    Berget is better organized and players have more fun.
     
  14. ssaasmc1

    ssaasmc1 New Member

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    i heard about berget from gmr on deadrag as radio (green mountain rangers on a podcast)
     
  15. CaptFysh

    CaptFysh New Member

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    St. Louis
    Oh. My. God. I wish I was 18 :p That looks so amazing! I'm just COMPLETELY blown away. You lucky little... :p Just a question, why were there a bunch of guys wearing helmets? It seems like it'd bee too hot and heavy.
     
  16. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    Personal preference I guess, why does anyone wear a helmet in airsoft? The majority wore soft tops of some sort. Quite a few of the mechanised guys wore helmet because when you're bumping around in a truck it' easy to knock your head on something.
     
  17. CaptFysh

    CaptFysh New Member

    4,049
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    St. Louis
    Ah, ok. When you said "A few minor injuries", do you mean like chipped teeth and spraained ankles? Or just bruises?
     
  18. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    Well of course there were plenty of the usual cuts, scratches, scrapes etc. I got my fair few.

    As far as I know one of the NAF players lost a tooth and there were a couple of ankle twists, sprains etc. One guy had an asthma attack and forgot his inhaler so he had to be transported off game by staff.
     
  19. CaptFysh

    CaptFysh New Member

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    St. Louis
    Not too bad. It seems like the staff really run it smoothly, and the players too.
     
  20. Robin-Hood

    Robin-Hood Active Member

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    Considering how few staff there are it was really quite impressive. There were a few hitches and plenty of things I would improve on but they did a pretty damn good job.

    They pretty much set everything up and then leave the players to play with as little interference as possible.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2011