Co2 revovler help

Discussion in 'Gas Powered Guns' started by blowback2000, Dec 27, 2012.

  1. blowback2000

    blowback2000 New Member

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    I just got my hands on an awesome revovler but aparrently it is too powerful, how powerful is three joules?
     

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  2. marine121496

    marine121496 Wahahaha~ Supporting Member

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    1 joule is 328 fps, IIRC from Japanese law, so 3 would be about a thousand.
     

  3. blowback2000

    blowback2000 New Member

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    Woah, are you sure? That can't be. :O
     
  4. MR38

    MR38 New Member

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    Washington
    It calculated to be about 550 fps which is about right for a Co2 pistol with that long of a barrel. The shortest barrel Wingun revolvers shot just under 400 fps.

    http://www.gamepod.com/fps_calculator.php
     
  5. blowback2000

    blowback2000 New Member

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    Thanks! :) really helps!
     
  6. MR38

    MR38 New Member

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    I'm glad to help out your welcome.
     
  7. marine121496

    marine121496 Wahahaha~ Supporting Member

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    Can you explain how to do this whole math deal then? Because I'm certain that 1 joule is 328 FPS, not saying you're wrong in fact your answer does sound more reasonable, I just don't understand how to get there.
     
  8. MR38

    MR38 New Member

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    Take a look at the link I posted and insert 3 joules with a .20 gram bb.
     
  9. CoppertopNeasg

    CoppertopNeasg New Member

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    It has to do with the correlation between inertia and velocity being an exponential function.
     
  10. Vandal

    Vandal New Member

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    Atlanta
    I've got the same problem with my wingun, I use it against friends, not at any arenas..
     
  11. Sparky_D

    Sparky_D Moderator Staff Member

    11,980
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    Pierce County

    The equation is below:


    VARIABLES: E is Energy of the moving object (in Joules)
    m is Mass of the moving object (in kilograms)
    v is Velocity of the moving object (in meters per second)
     

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