Cold weather?

Discussion in 'General Airsoft Discussion' started by Joshpeck, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. Joshpeck

    Joshpeck Member

    822
    0
    Eau Claire
    Ey I was wondering is 30 degrees farenheight and lower bad for your aeg? Me and my friend were talking about airsoft in the winter. I was wondering if cold weather was bad.
     
  2. Lefse

    Lefse Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    6,226
    1,837
    Hm, you might wanna be careful below 15*F, metal has a tendency to become brittle in strong cold. I have played airsoft at around 30*F and didn't have any issues with my guns, just try and keep your battery warm to not loose too much voltage.
     

  3. Shiftyshooter

    Shiftyshooter Learn from your mistakes. Lifetime Supporter

    10,229
    23
    Prague
    I have played several times in winter where the temperature were getting at around -10 degrees Centigrade and all my guns work just fine.
     
  4. 703

    703 Active Member

    1,975
    7
    webster
    I've played in the winter before and never had a problem.

    However if you run standard NIHM batteries keep them warm or they will die a lot faster than usuall.
    If you run lipos it shouldn't be an issue.
     
  5. Whiplashairsoft1

    Whiplashairsoft1 New Member

    1,209
    1
    42 Wallaby Way
    ^ Right. NiMh and NiCd batteries just cease to exist in the cold.
     
  6. Knief

    Knief Moderator Moderator

    13,850
    12
    Ann Arbor
    From an entirely subjective measure, it always seems like you see more gears and pistons strip during winter games. That might be confirmation bias, but it's enough that I tend to run my easily repairable/replaceable AEGs in the winter and keep the more expensive guns at home.

    I've saved many an afternoon by bringing my battery into McDonalds or wherever for lunch to warm it up. It won't let you shoot like you would during the summer, but it'll give you a few hundred more rounds.
     
  7. FSTK

    FSTK Member

    877
    0
    From a scientific standpoint: cold weather means less heat to expands/contract.

    For a battery: this means energy required for electrolysis will be less potent because there's less of it. In a scenario between 2000 rounds per charge: it's safe to assume you'll get about 80% efficiency. This is assuming wire gauge is optimal to voltage rating. can be covered here: https://www.jlmwholesale.com/images/WIREGAUGE.pdf. If we invoke Ohm's Law: cold weather provides less resistance along the AEG's wiring but the lower temperature would result in a lower average speed of electrons and therefore more energy is required to reach similar performance in cold weather. This shows in the loss of 20% energy because it's being used up as entropy. Imagine your shower for example: a certain amount of water is being wasted before the hot water comes. It's not the same scientific principles but it paints the picture about electron loss and entropy. Electrons/water are lost along the wiring in order to reach its destinations: (in this case: your motor/showerhead). Overall: solid connection points and wire gauge would play a role in how efficient your battery is during cold-weather games. Insulating your battery with like styrofoam usually helps too. A cold battery means a less effective battery. You can't stop the ambient cold, but you can do something about those cold surfaces.

    The motor itself won't be affected as it's mostly made of metal. Its physical properties in this case can be neglected as there's so much potential energy in aluminum/steel for this case that it's not going to "snap" any time soon because of the cold: if anything your piston would snap far sooner than your motor/gears under extreme abuses in the cold. However this assumes your motor is "ideal". If you're running a LiPo: expect the temperature to rise faster if your wiring isn't properly measured to the amount of amps you're taking in. If your motor is cheap and has a cheap capacitor inside: expect less performance from your battery as the capacitors tendency to convert a portion of your electron flow into wasted energy increases with colder weather. If you buy a good quality aftermarket that's made of proper metals(not pot-metal) and good contstruction: I wouldn't worry about it breaking/wearing down.

    The kinds of lubricants used in your AEG will play a role as cheap kinds of grease(or worse: no grease) will cause improper mechanical operation which could result in gears stripping or small chunks of metal to deposit in your gearbox. Grease like lithium grease by nature has a lower viscosity and most AEGs do have them so this normally isn't an issue if you buy the bottles and do it yourself or buy your AEG from companies like....ARES, CA, VFC, G&G, G&P, etc. The only time to worry about lubricants is if you have an AEG from like...JG, Echo 1, some Wal-mart brand. Their grease is weird. As long as you have a proper shim job and grease job: cold weather usually isn't a factor. Heat isn't a factor in grease unless it's the cheap blue kind.

    The Piston is where physical properties do matter as this is the part that is likely to be stressed the most. Physical properties of polycarbonate do matter in colder weather as cheaply made ones tend to have lower tensile strength which means the force applied to each teeth will be magnified in colder weather. All kinds of solids have a rating for how much they deform which is directly proportional to how much heat is available. When an object deforms: heat is absorbed. When an object reforms: heat is lost through entropy. If there isn't enough heat to absorb when deforming: it snaps to conserve energy. (or what little there is in cold weather). Buy a quality piston and you shouldn't have any problems. I personally use a half-metal teeth set. Those that shave off teeths to obtain higher RoF would be the ones that need to worry about their pistons.

    Hop-up bucking will play a small role as well in accuracy. Good soft-bucking won't be hard enough from the cold to cause jamming regardless of FPS. However those with hard-bucking should exercise some caution and make sure your gearbox is optimal. I know from first-hand experience that using silicone over regular latex bucking types is more ideal in cold weather. Better hop-up effect as silicone is naturally more smoother. The colder weather also means silicone can stand up to the cold easier and won't wear as quickly.

    So in conclusion: if your AEG is properly maintained with proper wiring, you can play in cold weather operation with little problems. Otherwise: exercise some caution. Having anything less doesn't mean it's exactly "bad" for your AEG. But don't expect the same performance.

    However if you're an experienced player using a clone AEG: you guys.....don't really count. You know the tricks already.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2012
  8. soviet

    soviet Active Member

    4,121
    0
    He's from the Czech Republic. I don't think it gets that cold where you are. Lol
     
  9. Joshpeck

    Joshpeck Member

    822
    0
    Eau Claire
    Thanks guys, I think what I might do is I will put a hand warmer thin inside the handgaurd with my battery.
     
  10. Whiplashairsoft1

    Whiplashairsoft1 New Member

    1,209
    1
    42 Wallaby Way
    I've heard of that...Just don't let it get too hot. Thens youz haf mo problemz, yes?
     
  11. Shiftyshooter

    Shiftyshooter Learn from your mistakes. Lifetime Supporter

    10,229
    23
    Prague
    I don't know if you are aware of it, but the climate is identical in most US.
     
  12. soviet

    soviet Active Member

    4,121
    0
    In TN? Lol jk but norther USA maybe.