JG/GE/LT M16A3 won't fire.

Discussion in 'Gun Building, Modifications & Repairs' started by Dead_Christmas, Apr 18, 2021.

  1. aotsukisho

    aotsukisho Well-Known Member

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    Rubbing during use, pinching during assembly, could just be faulty insulation

    You don't necessarily have to solder motor connectors 'well', they are essentially crimp connectors and nothing is particularly heat-sensitive. Tin the U in the connector then tin the wire and it should be relatively easy as all you need to do is put the wire in the U then heat it up.

    Not everyone has specialist tools on hand, and I've used paperclips successfully to unstick ARLs
     
  2. Dead_Christmas

    Dead_Christmas Active Member

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    OK, I went on and bought a few dental tools. This is what I have ordered:

    [​IMG]

    Am I on the right angle, here?
     

  3. Guges Mk3

    Guges Mk3 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Yes you are an more!

    Try that paper clip with a guy who put in a SystemA M130 in a double bearing system with the piston locked back, because his battery and motor couldn't pull it past the break point. A paper clip isn't going to unlock the ARL... :p
     
  4. aotsukisho

    aotsukisho Well-Known Member

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    Interesting, since that was a very similar scenario to the one I was in - MS120SP bottomed out in a G&G gearbox due to PME. It wasn't easy, but it worked

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Dead_Christmas

    Dead_Christmas Active Member

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    Thanks everybody. The tools are coming out of Saint Paul, so we won't have to wait years for it. Once I get them, I'll work my trog magic and see if I don't break anything.
     
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  6. Guges Mk3

    Guges Mk3 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I had to go through the bottom of the mechbox via the motor hole. Had to give it a good yank too, to get it to release.

    You used a paperclip through the same hole?

    Sorry DC for thread jacking.
     
  7. aotsukisho

    aotsukisho Well-Known Member

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    Yep, pulled off the grip then used flathead screwdriver on one of the bevel gear ratchets to remove tension off the ARL and unhooked the ARL with paperclip. Wasn't just the paperclip lol I should've said earlier
     
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  8. Dead_Christmas

    Dead_Christmas Active Member

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    Not a problem at all. Doesn't bother me.
     
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  9. Guges Mk3

    Guges Mk3 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Hah! Big difference... :p
     
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  10. wetpee

    wetpee Active Member

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    This is a very good video on V2 disassembly/reassembly. Watch this several times and then follow along as you open yours up. If you follow this video, you should have no problems. Pay attention to where your shims are. One tip I have is if you try to depress the nozzle a bit -- just enough to relieve pressure from the tappet plate off the sector gear, you can avoid the chance of flinging those shims away as you pull the case half up. Bushings and shims may stick to either the gear axles or the gearbox shell so just be attentive on where they are. Have some place on your work surface to place your shims in a way that will help easily distinguish where they all belong. I use notecards with each gear name written out with a line to separate top and bottom. The common names of these gears in order from drive to driven gear is
    motor pinion -> bevel -> spur -> sector
    I think you might be surprised with the level of confidence you gain in opening up a gearbox from this.

    If you struggle with disassembling the body of the gun, just be attentive and careful as you remove anything especially the mag release mechanism as it has a spring that can fling the mag release button and/or its fastener.

    For help with soldering, I found that a separate paste flux helps a lot. cheap and easy to find on Amazon. I put it on everything I want to add solder to, heat it up so it spreads throughout the wire threads and the corresponding item I'm soldering to, then tin both. solder goes to where the flux is. very easy. from this point, just secure the surface you're attaching the wire to in whatever fashion your tools allow, heat up the surface and slide the wire into place with some patience (a thick glove on this hand might be helpful), all the solder on the wire should then melt and fuse with the solder on the corresponding surface, remove your iron and let it cool and bam. you should have a pretty clean joint.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2021
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  11. Dead_Christmas

    Dead_Christmas Active Member

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    That's the weirdest part: I have a nice Hakko FX88, several tips, auxiliary flux, brass wool and a sponge, and I still can barely ever get it to happen. I've soldered deans before *once*, successfully, and it still looked awful. I'll record a video of me soldering when and if it comes to that. I'm only 90% sure that I just can't swing it at the moment with my technique.

    Unfortunately, the seller I ordered from has still not sent out my picks, and probably won't considering recent seller feedback.

    [​IMG]

    This is what I ordered from another MN location, different seller. Hopefully they're thin/long enough. We'll see.
     
  12. aotsukisho

    aotsukisho Well-Known Member

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    You need to run the iron hot to properly solder to Deans, I normally do it at 360-380°C

    1. Strip and tin your wire, put enough solder to where the strands aren't defined and make sure it's even around the entire wire.
    2. Score the Deans plug solder terminal with a knife for better solder adhesion, I crosshatch like #
    3. Connect the Deans plug with another (unused) one - this keeps the terminals from shifting when the plastic gets soft. I don't like to use battery adapters as the wire attached to the connector acts as a heatsink and makes soldering more difficult
    4. Tin the Deans solder terminal and put enough solder to make a slight bulge
    5. Hold the iron on the Deans terminal and touch the tinned wire to the top of the iron tip until it also melts. I advise using pliers to hold the wire
    6. Push the hot wire down into the Deans terminal with the iron tip and hold until liquid solder 'sucks up' with capillary action and surface tension into the wire, should be a couple seconds with proper heat

    Your Hakko should suffice, product listing says the iron heating element is 65W when my Aoyue 768 is 45W. Perhaps I should make a video too.
     
  13. gunnerk19

    gunnerk19 Active Member

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    You don't have a Northern Tool or Harbor Freight in your neighborhood you could walk in and buy from?
     
  14. Dead_Christmas

    Dead_Christmas Active Member

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    We genuinely don't have any at our Hardware Hank, and I'm too beat after work to stop and home depot.
     
  15. Guges Mk3

    Guges Mk3 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Home Depot doesn't always have the "good stuff".
     
  16. OutlawAirsoft

    OutlawAirsoft Active Member

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    I used to struggle when soldering deans, but I have worked out a process now that works well:

    1) I always secure the actual deans connector in my fish-hook clamp (for tying flies), something that is very useful for soldering small components without burning yourself, overheating your parts, or making a mess of things.

    2) Cut and strip the wires you are going to solder to the connector. If it is a battery, cut only one lead, to make sure you don't short it out.

    3) Slide appropriate heat shrink onto the wires, pushing it far enough back to avoid shrinking it prematurely with the iron (I use 1/8 2:1 inch tubing for 16-18g wire, and smaller tube for smaller wires).

    4) I then apply flux liberally to both the stripped wires and the deans tabs.

    5) Tin the wire with solder, and then tin the deans until there is a solid lump of solder on the tab. I use 40/60 Oatey solder from Ace, and that works pretty well.

    6) Press the wire against the proper tab and heat it with the iron until the solder on the wire mixes with the solder on the tab. Double-check the polarity of the wires and the deans connector before soldering.

    7) Slide up the heat shrink and shrink it.

    8) Repeat the process for the other lead.

    I've been soldering deans connectors for years with a cheap iron (I used to do it with a non-temp controlled one) and have never had a connection fail. Hopefully this mini-guide helps someone, because it's about the only "techy" thing I can do successfully on the first try.
     
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  17. Guges Mk3

    Guges Mk3 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    However, if you are changing the connector on the battery, do not solder with a low power iron.

    Heat transfer into a battery is bad. Set up a heat sink to draw away heat from the battery side if you are using a weak iron.

    I use a 100W iron and my technique has the tip on the solder point for less than a couple of second, but the heat still moves quickly.
     
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  18. Dead_Christmas

    Dead_Christmas Active Member

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    I am not changing the battery connector. I have tens of batteries that I can use, and many adapters. However, you are correct. During my time with learning about spot-welding I heard many discuss the same information.
     
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  19. OutlawAirsoft

    OutlawAirsoft Active Member

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    Pretty sure mine is 50w, but I'm not sure.
     
  20. Dead_Christmas

    Dead_Christmas Active Member

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    I have excellent news! Using one of the orange picks that arrived today I managed to unlock the ARL, which was indeed stuck. It made a small "pop" and then seemingly went back into normal position. I was able to test it with a 7.4 v battery, and it fired twice!

    However, I have one more obstacle in my way, and it could take some effort to fix. The small red-wire's motor connector split in half, and I have no idea what size blade connector, female, it is. I believe they're called .110? It's a crimp-on, rather than soldered connector.

    Does anybody know the exact spec for this connector? My caliper measures these at the closest, .150 rather than .110.
     
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