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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the very recent past (last 12 months) nearly every "Mock Suppressor" (aka, mock silencer . shhhh!) now seems to come EMPTY (no foam tube sound wave absorber) and SEALED. Hell, they amplify the sound instead! Lot good that does if you're the squad's DMR or Sniper!

While I have seen a very few with a tig weld on them, the vast majority seem to be glued, with damn good glue, closed so you can't unscrew them. I've never seen a mock unit that doesn't have CW threads for the End Caps (not talking about the barrel thread).

Example, I just bought a few "Lancer Tactical" branded (we all know Lancer doesn't make these) mock suppressor's, nicely made and cheap out of Aluminum. If you shine a bright Bore Light into the barrel thread opening, you can see a glue like material at the junction of the end cap and the internal threads of the "tube".

If you've found a TRIED AND TRUE method for dissolving the glues being used, WITHOUT damaging the Metal Tube or finish, PLEASE SHARE. Only if YOU have personally done so ---- no I think, or I guess, or someone said, BS please.

Things I've tried that haven't worked:

Gripping the housing tube and the end caps with Rubber bottle cap opener pads - NOT!
Please don't even think of recommending pipe wrenches! - NOT!
Boiling ends in hot water for 10 minutes - NOT!
WD40 or Liquid Wrench - NOT!

Got Idea's That Worked ?????


OLDER ones of these below, and other's, used to open easily with no "Glue"; and many came with nice high density foam tubes, and some came with cheap crap foam.

Rectangle Font Cylinder Metal Auto part

Font Parallel Screenshot Titanium Number
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The only perfect method I know of is to cut a flat sheet of open cell foam in approx the right size, roll it up tight, and slip it in through the muzzle. Can't use thick foam, can't use rings, but if keeping your finish scratch free etc is top priority this is about the best option.

If you're less worried about the paint, heat gun to soften the glue, wrap a towel around it and give it a twist. Can help to thread the cap onto a spare barrel and clamp that down with a vice.
For what I'm doing with these shells, the rolled up foam (in some cases, no foam at all is used) isn't going to help me. Some of the Mock Suppressors get a Tracer installed with a noise "reduction" as well, some with barrel extension support rings and some just "something", so getting the caps off is necessary.

I've tried Heat Guns, even industrial ones, and that hasn't worked. I was hoping that someone has found a glue solvent that works .... without dissolving Aluminum, that is. All I need is one end off. Was thinking of just plugging one end with a 14x1mm I make on my lathe and pour the solvent in the other end. But I know nothing about glue solvents .... whatever glue that they are using.

Before someone suggests Boiling Water, here is the problem - Heat expands materials, aluminum is perfect for this, BUT if you stick one end of the Mock suppressor into boiling water, you are heating BOTH the threaded cylinder part AND the threaded cap, so both expand; you never create a difference between the cylinder and the cap's threads to loosen it. The Heat Gun creates the same issue.

The Mock Suppressors that they sell in HK, Taiwan, S Korea, Japan are not glued or whatever they use to "lock them", but buying them from there has two problems - 1) Shipping from any of those countries is Mega Expensive, and 2) I hear US Customs is confiscating them if they aren't sealed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Does NOT solve my need to remove the end caps. Spray foam is inconsistent, leaves unpredictable voids, has to be the size of the dowel which has to be the size of the exist hole which is at least 14mm, far too big for a 6mm BB! D'uh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, this is probably the worst "solution" by far, but you could take a hacksaw and yoink the back off, get your foam in there and then jb weld it together (TIG might deform the thin walls?).
You do win the near "worst solution". JB Weld is so overrated, all it is, is epoxy with metal partials in it. It wouldn't last a day in hard MilSim play, or any normal extended use. I tried using JB for a Zinc M9 slide that cracked and broke at the weak point under the safety, it didn't even last one mag of BB's

Besides, the guys I build Suppressors or inner barrel extension "covers" for wouldn't appreciate a glued together unit.

Save your JB for temporarily plugging a hole in your muffler.

Seriously, thanks for the try, though. Need to find someone who knows for sure what these China Mock Suppressor makers are using on the end caps and what Solvent HAS ACTUALLY worked to dissolve that glue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hmm I thought of something that makes my idea (less??) stupid[er] haha: after ya dice your can and fill it with foam, measure the diameter of the can, buy tubular foam insulation with a similar diameter, slide the insulation around the can and find another can that's slightly larger in diameter to slip around the foam which is around the first can (for this to work you would have to cut your can in half, then somehow find another can larger in diameter, cut the bottom off, and slide it on) ...does this sound even more stupid? Possibly, but I did something similar to get a tracer unit inside an amplifier.
Careful, you are going for an F- grade now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If I just find out if the Chinese are using Epoxy Glue or CA glue on these sealed Mock Suppressors, there is a way.

UniBond of England, probably the best known for commercial Epoxy Glues has this great article.
I'm leaning towards the glue they used as Epoxy, because looking in the 14mm threaded hole with a fibre scope, the bond is shinny and thick like Epoxy, while CA is essentially invisible. Think I may experiment on one of the cheap shorty Mock units first.

Epoxy: how to use and remove - Epoxy glue is one of the most useful and versatile tools for DIY projects. Whatever material you’re using be it wood, metal or plastic – make sure you choose the right epoxy to get the best result. Read on to learn how to use epoxy correctly, and give your project a professional touch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This doesn't help you with the units you have already purchased but for future purchases you could go with the Novritch mock suppressors. These arrive without the end cap glued on. We all know that he isn't manufacturing these himself, so with a little sleuthing you may be able to track down who is manufacturing these for him.
Thanks for the reply, I was doing some Asia web source surfing, and on the 6mm.com site (HK), they carry Novritch over-priced branded / made in China stuff. They had a couple of his suppressors and then the exact identical ones unbranded that were 1/3 the price. Problem is that shipping from HK and other west "Pacific Rim" countries is outrageous. The people at 6mm are great, great prices and they ship REAL fast, but the shipping costs MORE than the total price of the items you're buying, and that was still "Snail mail" airmail (30 day delivery). Plus, some off-shore sellers warn you that some items that with US Custom's recent "Brandon" led anti-gun initiative doesn't like (like unsealed Suppressors, steel triggers, hammer, etc), Customs HAS BEEN confiscating. (welcome to China USA)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Surprised no one has mentioned this one yet.....I've used acetone to dissolve a few different types of glue, adhesive-residue and various types of paint. I'd suggest getting at least a cup or more and simply leaving the glued end in it to soak. You might try running a cutter blade around the seam to give the acetone a head start. With an open tube like that it should have no problem soaking into the inside seam as well. Acetone won't hurt aluminum but it may remove the finish....no idea what your finish is but since everything else has failed, it's at least worth a shot.
Tell me about it.
Yep, in fact I just ordered a bunch of GBBP and R parts, when I placed the order there was a warning about this and it directs you to a permanent statement ON THEIR (sixmm.com) site. These guys a big operation, a lot of Airsofter reference them, I seriously doubt they are BSing buyers. I'll see what happens when / if my order shows up. Check out sixmm.com website in the shipping info page.

Dont shoot the messenger, just repeating what I personally received as a warning.

Ok, now about solvents, I did find several YouTube videos and a couple online articles about this very issue of the glued Suppressor tubes. I thought I posted that earlier, guess I forgot. All those sources mentioned using Acetone and also 90% Alchohol (that working best on "superglue"). I was hoping someone knew what they are using on these tube caps. As I wrote earlier, with an illuminated bore scope, it looks like used Epoxy, its shiny and thick along the junction of the cap and the tube. I think I will try Acetone first, it also works on Superglue.
ADDENDUM- I DID mention using solvents in this earlier post, referencing the "Uni Bond of England" website
Epoxy: how to use and remove

You have any thoughts, especially on how to put force on the cap and tube to get it off without damaging it? Not worried about finish, I'll Cerakote it afterwards anyways to match the airsoft gun its going on, even camouflaged if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
PER THE UniBond Website (the worlds LEADING manufacturer of Epoxy Glues)
Quote:
Removing epoxy glue

Epoxy glue is long-lasting, designed to create permanent bonding. So naturally, it’s not the easiest substance to remove so you should take care when applying the epoxy adhesive. However, if you do end up getting epoxy in the wrong place, don’t worry – there is a solution!

Removing uncured epoxy is very simple. Before the epoxy resin glue sets you can simply use white vinegar or methylated spirit on a cloth. Just make sure to wipe away the excess epoxy before it’s had time to dry.
Removing cured epoxy from surfaces

Once the epoxy hardens, it becomes more difficult to remove. However, it’s not impossible! Try one of the following methods to remove cured epoxy glue:

  • Sand or scrape the area. If there’s only a small amount of dried epoxy, this technique may be sufficient.
  • Use acetone. Acetone can be effective on wood or concrete surfaces. It should loosen the epoxy, so you can peel it away easily. Use acetone only in well-ventilated areas and keep it away from any flammable objects.
  • Use a heat gun. You must wear thick work gloves, goggles and a mask when using a heat gun, and make sure that your skin is completely covered. Use the heat gun at a temperature of about 90 °C, aiming it at small areas of the epoxy until it softens. You can then use a plastic scraper to remove the epoxy.
  • Use chemicals. If you’re removing epoxy from plastic or glass, you can use chemicals to soften the epoxy, and then scrape it away. If the epoxy has only just dried, soak a cloth in methylated spirit and wipe the surface to remove the epoxy. If the epoxy is cured and proves to be stubborn to remove, try applying paint thinner first to soften it up.

Exercise caution when using these methods, and always use protective gloves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
@Rocker69

I remember that trick, we used to buy hardwood dowels, taper them very slightly on a wood lathe, and it worked great. I used to race ISDT and Enduro's, my boys had a Honda endorsement for a decade in 50cc. 80cc, 125 and 250cc, then lost interest. I enjoyed "wrenching" more than racing.

BUT, the threads on these suppressors are SUPER Fine thread M14x1 and not enough depth to "grab" the wood. I tried using a hard oak dowel and it just spun.

I have what I think every serious Airsofter should buy, a set of CCW Taps and Dies in M14x1, M12x1, M11x1 and M10x1, there are several reputable sellers on EBay that sell very good (not great, but good enough) sets made in China, Taiwan and S Korea, that are surprisingly affordable. There are so German and Italian made pairs, on EBay too, but considerably more expensive. I have yet to have an issue with even the China made Taps and Dies.

I'll just take a hardened 3/4" or 5/8" bolt and cut down the threads on my bench lathe and turn it into M14x1 CCW bolt to screw into the end cap, clamped into a bench vice and use a strap wrench with rubber wrapped around the metal tube first, to turn the suppressor body, once the Acetone loosens the Epoxy glue.
 
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