Too hot to play

Discussion in 'General Airsoft Discussion' started by TopShot21, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. TopShot21

    TopShot21 New Member

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    The only day i can play airsoft this month is going to be around 100 degrees. Should I not go or is there something I can do so the heat won't bother me as much
     
  2. Frostbite1

    Frostbite1 New Member

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    Frisco
    I've played in hotter, it's the heat is a killer and I have seen a couple of people drop during the middle of a firefight due to heat stroke. My suggestion its fine to go as long as your wearing at least a 2 liter hydration career. And drink constantly, plus I would have some electrolyte recovery drink's in a cooler in the safe zone. Remember if you stop sweating your way too dehydrated.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012

  3. TopShot21

    TopShot21 New Member

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    I don't have a hydration carrier. Do you know any cheap ones that have straps not Molle
     
  4. Batman

    Batman New Member

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    Wichita
    Dude come to Kansas. On an average summer afternoon it's about 100-105 ish with 50% humidity
     
  5. theonlyBuster

    theonlyBuster Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    S. Florida
    Heat is definitely a killer. Even down here in the sunshine state, 80 degrees doesn't sound bad, until you notice there's zero cloud cover and barely any breeze. Even carrying 2 gallons of water on the field can leave you exhausted. For that reason, I play VERY sparsely during the summer. And when I do play it's often a late afternoon or night game.

    If you do decide to play in the midst of the heat, I highly advise you get a camel pack and fill it with cool water. wear some sort of head covering. Prepare yourself days in advanced by cutting artificial juices and sodas from your diet and simply drink as much water as you can. There are also neck cooling thinggies that keep your head and neck cool
    No matter how good/bad the game is going, take a few seconds to do a mental check of your vitals: Do I feel light-headed, am I sweating, when was the last time I drank water, does my heart beat feel "normal", how are my buddies...
    Bring granola bars or small bags of trail mix onto the field. They're a great way to boost energy when needed.

    Most importantly know the signs of heat exhaustion and stroke AS WELL AS how to CORRECTLY treat them.
    ie Dowsing someone with cold water is NOT how you treat the symptoms, and could cause the person to go into shock.
     
  6. CajunAirsoft

    CajunAirsoft New Member

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    It can get to like 105 in Louisiana and the humidity is normally around 80%. I am pretty used to it because I have lived here my whole life. When I go up north the air feels so light. I would say make sure your hydrated days before also.
     
  7. UsMc-alltheway

    UsMc-alltheway New Member

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    First of all wear light weight long pants and see if you can find a dry fit camo shirt as that will help immensely, also try staying hydrated.
     
  8. BRTSoloWing

    BRTSoloWing Well-Known Member

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    I know its late in the summer but if you know about all of this stuff you should make a thread about it. You know the signs, avoidance, proper treatment, every thing we need to know. Or if some one could do it, that would be grate.
     
  9. 703

    703 Active Member

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    webster
    Heat is definatly a killer... Make sure to bring lots of water. I usually freeze a few bottles the night before.
    You can buy a hydration pack at walmart for ~20.00 and I would highly suggest it. Pace yourself throughout the day don't over due it.

    I wouldn't suggest going fully geared up either. Wear as least as you can so that you are protected and have items you need to carry.

    Depending on where you play it will be cooler in the woods than in direct sunlight.
     
  10. theonlyBuster

    theonlyBuster Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    14,153
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    S. Florida
    I'm at the moment considering it, but at the same time prevention is the best method.
    Drink plenty of water, even when you don't need it drink it.

    If you find someone who's delirious, complaining about cramps, vomiting, not sweating at all, or shows signs of confusion or light-headedness they most likely have dyhydration, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke.

    Treatment is the same for most all of them. Drink water (cool or room temperature), remove vest/rig or cumbersome gear, remove any tight-fitting clothing, dowse or submerge in cool to room temperature water.
    Never use cold or ice water in situations where the victim is confused or vomiting as it can easily lead to shock.
    Once treated, the person should relax in the shade for the rest of the day.
    And of course, if symptoms don't get better, 9-1-1.

    Simplest way check yourself for dehydration, simply pee. If it's dark in color, drink more water. Your goal is to pee clear-ish.



    With that said, we've gone off topic a bit. So if you want to continue this topic please make a new thread and there members can converse about heat illnesses
     
  11. BRTSoloWing

    BRTSoloWing Well-Known Member

    1,517
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    China Grove
    Okay, thanks for the info man
     
  12. CQB

    CQB New Member

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    If its too hot, bring a mini cooler with drinks and rags. Apply the cold rag to your forehead and relax.
     
  13. NOMAD666

    NOMAD666 New Member

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    bikini bottom
    My dad was in Iraq he said it got to 130 sometimes stop crying. LOL just kidding. I Live in AZ. just take only the needed items on your gear. Drink lots of water. Dont play if your to hot take a break sometimes. I have gone to the hospital for heat exaustion.....Not fun.
     
  14. Thestig

    Thestig Some say... Supporting Member

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    Colorado Springs and Southern California
    This is gonna be weird, but wig you are wearing any sort of BDUs or Camo, wear skin tight dry fit gear, to keep you dry. The dryer you are, the cooler you generally will be. I wear Nike Dry Fit sleeves, and Champion Summer gear Leggings. Go to Target, and buy their champion form fitting dry fit. Make sure it is summer, not winter. A set will cost no less than $15. It has helped me through ops where it has been 100. It has also helped me through baseball games where field temps have been in excess of 110.

    But the most important thing has already been stated. Drink LOTS of water. An average person, in normal temps, should drink 3 liters a day. Add more for days with heat an physical exertion.
     
  15. TopShot21

    TopShot21 New Member

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    I already have a champion dry fit shirt, and I have a mini cooler so I'll bring that too. I think I'm good because I use a chest rig. Should I carry a bottle with me on the field.
     
  16. Thestig

    Thestig Some say... Supporting Member

    1,265
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    Colorado Springs and Southern California
    Oh yes. It is just good invade you or somebody else goes down.
     
  17. Grin

    Grin New Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Irvine
    Always carry at least one extra bottle onto the field in hot weather. You'll be surprised how much water you can go through! As a tip that I've seen mentioned in this thread before, try freezing your water the night before. It'll keep it nice and cool.
     
  18. BoogerMc

    BoogerMc Airsoft Jedi Master Supporting Member

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    Akron
    Wal-Mart sells some nice hydration packs in their camping area, they even have a replacement pouch that has a gel substance around the bladder that can be frozen to keep the water colder longer. However, it should be noted that too cold of water can be detrimental. It can actually make things worse. When you body is in the various stages of heat exhaustion, giving it ice cold water can actually send you into shock because extremely cold water causes the blood to shrink away from any area of the body it touches. Considering that means that drinking ice cold water places the water near your main artery and vein, the ones in your neck, it can slow or stop the flow of blood to the brain. This causes shock.

    A lot of good ideas have been posted, keeping cool, wet rags or washcloths in a cooler, drinking lots of water, and wearing clothes that will help wisk away sweat are all on the money. However, one very important tip, take a lot of breaks, if possible take them in the shade. Keep a fan nearby, especially one that uses a mister to spray water on your face and head.

    Most importantly, use the buddy system. Always have a wingman to watch over you and vice-versa. If one of you sees the other having problems, then this person can call for help. If you use radios, this makes response time that much quicker.

    Go, play, enjoy, and have fun, but above all be safe.
     
  19. Bulldawg26

    Bulldawg26 Active Member

    1,197
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    Atlanta
    You might want to pick up a "Frog Tog" towel. If you get it wet, it gets cold. I wear one under my shemagh during the summer. It is a lifesaver. You can get one at most sports stores for @ $15.