unofficial fields

Discussion in 'General Airsoft Discussion' started by Defcon5, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. Defcon5

    Defcon5 New Member

    362
    0
    Hey guys, I searched all over and in the search engine about unofficial fields, but came up short handed. I was wandering if it was legal to build your own place and charge people to play on it. Also, what would be good cover and obstacles to put in it? Its about 3 and a half acres and I was planning on getting some wire spools, barrels, etc. Any other ideas?
     
  2. marine121496

    marine121496 Wahahaha~ Supporting Member

    7,502
    4
    Ann Arbor
    Eh maybe I mean unless you got serious amounts of customers I doubt people will care but if you make enough you may have to file taxes and whatnot. Not to mention you may be legally responsible for injuries and such things.
     

  3. 703

    703 Active Member

    1,977
    7
    Public land - NO

    Private land - Depends...

    Is it a close group of friends or are you going to open it up to the "public" lets say but still keeping it on the down low ?

    As far as what makes good bunkers - go to youtube and watch videos Im sure you can get tons of ideas.
     
  4. Defcon5

    Defcon5 New Member

    362
    0
    A little bit of both. But I'll make a waver and have them sighn it
     
  5. stxrus

    stxrus New Member

    479
    0
    Cotton Valley
    yes, you should be able to set up your own field or whatever. if you are going to charge to play then you will probably need a business license AND insurance. taxes, at that point can be a real PITA. you can operate at a loss for a few yers and then the iRS looks at you like a glorified hobby and the tax rules change.

    if you are looking to establish a business talk to a CPA, lawyer, the SBA before you get too far along
     
  6. 703

    703 Active Member

    1,977
    7
    First off if it's public land you CAN NOT build on it. It's like going into a public park and building a cabin, you just cant do that.

    A waiver really doesn't mean anything if it's public land since you probaly shouldn't be playing there anyways. Not to mention if it's not backed up by a lawyer it really has no value to it. If someone were to seriously get hurt thier lawyer would tear your "waiver" apart in a heartbeat.

    Since you are running it as a buisness you will need permits, pay taxes, proper insurance Also you need the towns permission to open the field. All this involves time & paperwork.

    Where exactly is the field. Is it your backyard that backs up to public land or is it a park or somesort ? I can tell you right now the town will deny it becuase its partly public land.

    Don't start building or charging until you get all the legal stuff in order. A field by me failed to get all the permits and on the grand opening they were shut down. Even after going through the proper procedures the town still voted against it. They spent a lot of time & money putting the field together... If they had done things the right way it still probaly would have got denied but at least they would have saved the money they spent building the field.

    Even if you don't open it to the public and keeping it more on the down low you still have to think about all this.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2012
  7. ncore

    ncore New Member

    1,061
    0
    Pittsburgh
    this

    and

    And remember, even if you have them sign a waiver, there are still ways for people to get around it and sue you.
     
  8. INFANTRYPRO

    INFANTRYPRO New Member

    598
    0
    I know it's a bit off topic but at one I the local parks near my house I organized with the city an airsoft game for every Sunday. It's really awesome and I suggest talking to your city commissioners about doing the same.
     
  9. Defcon5

    Defcon5 New Member

    362
    0
    Woah, woah woah. Hold up guys, Im not wanting it to be a business, just a hobby.
     
  10. ncore

    ncore New Member

    1,061
    0
    Pittsburgh
    Well if you were going to charge players, it pretty much is a business, as it generates revenue. As long as you make under a certain amount of money per year off of it, I don't think you need to pay any taxes.

    But if you are not looking to create an official business, there is no law that would prevent you from setting up little obstacles and barrels to use as cover. You might also have to make it invite only, by posting on your local airsoft forum. You certainly cannot submit it as a business on google and not be legally registered as a business.

    Also, you have to create waivers for your players to sign before starting.
     
  11. theonlyBuster

    theonlyBuster Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    14,150
    14
    S. Florida
    Whether is business or simple friends, you have to do certain things to protect yourself.
    IF it's just family:
    You'd need to contact your neighbors and let them know what's going on. Nothing gets a neighbor on the phone quicker than seeing a person running around in tact gear and a gun in their hand. Following that, you REALLY should prepare a fenced off area. Typically you want to have No Trespassing signs.

    IF you're inviting a couple friends:
    I'd create a safe staging area, and possibly add "Airsoft in Progress" signs along side the No Trespassing signs.

    IF your friends are bringing friends:
    You'll want to contact local law enforcement and let them know what's going on. I'd also go as far as having a physical written copy of laws regarding airsoft, pellet, BB, paintball, and clone weaponry.
    I'd also make waivers to have all players sign. Waivers don't hold up in court, but will definitely slow a person down from filing suit if something did occur.

    Money is the hard part, because by taking money/field fee you'd actually operating as a business. An illegal business, but business none the less.


    Basically what it comes down to is setting yourself up like a business whether you're taking money or not.
     
  12. 703

    703 Active Member

    1,977
    7
    You still have to go through the proper procedures.
     
  13. marine121496

    marine121496 Wahahaha~ Supporting Member

    7,502
    4
    Ann Arbor
    I don't even think minors can really sign waivers so if you got anyone under 18 coming you may want to look into that.
     
  14. 703

    703 Active Member

    1,977
    7
    This basically sums it up in a very laid back way... Also the fact that part of the land is public make sure you have the towns / Police departments permission to play. Also this might prevent the use of "no tresspassing" signs becuase it's public... Like buster said nothing gets a neighbor or civilian on the phone faster than a bunch of people running around with tactical gear and real looking rifles

    "most" of the time cops don't have a problem with airsoft it's more of a issue of neighbors call so they have to respond and if they have to keep coming out they get annoyed and will tell you, you cant play.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  15. Slayer

    Slayer New Member

    158
    0
    If you charge you need a business license, but you could except donations.
     
  16. stxrus

    stxrus New Member

    479
    0
    Cotton Valley
    then you have to become a non-profit. another set of legal headaches
     
  17. BoogerMc

    BoogerMc Airsoft Jedi Master Supporting Member

    4,821
    240
    Akron
    If you charge, do not charge it as a game fee, it is a membership fee. This eliminates the business issues. This is how we do it at B-B Wars. Although we have a license to operate as a businees, our license is for manufacturing; however, in order to test our gear, we play our games. Our games are by invite only and we charge a membership fee on a per game basis, according to our research and several discussions with lawyers and insurance reps, this is the only way to get around several of the issues. We do have a release waiver/permission slip to cover the gaps. However, it is still wise to check your locak rules and laws, check with a local lawyer and insurance agent, as this can vary from location to location.

    Mind you an invite only system does not mean you are limited to certain players, an invitation can be private or public. We generate private invites in the form of e-mails and text messages for steady players and public invites through forum posts and flyers to reach potential new players. There are always ways around certain issues, do your research and you'll find them.